I Am Number Four (Lorien Legacies #1) by Pittacus Lore


Wow. It’s been 25 days since I’ve last posted. This is way overdue. I have just been very busy. So, here is my latest review, which is of Pittacus Lore’s I Am Number Four.

I Am Number Four by Pittacus Lore

Book Rating: 3 out of 5

Genres: Fantasy, Sci-fi, Romance, Post Apocalyptic (in a sense)

Lorien, a planet near Earth, was destroyed by the Mogadorians. During the chaos, 9 children were sent to Earth with mentors to continue the race of the Lorics and someday fight back. These 9 children will develop powers, train, and will have to work together if they want to stand a chance against the Mogadorians. They are still being hunted down, except that they can only be killed in order, thanks to a charm cast by one of the elders.

In order to survive, they must keep moving from place to place, and shed all of their identities, and everything they’ve ever known, just to stay safe. But it isn’t enough. The first 3 were killed. And he’s next.

I Am Number Four was generously lent to me from a friend, who offered when I told him I had nothing to read. I accepted it with thanks, thinking that I’d like it, because I’d seen the movie, and it wasn’t that bad.

Overall, it was an okay book. It wasn’t horrible, but it wasn’t one of those books where I told every single person I knew and bugged them to read it. It was like, “Read, and move on.”

The characters were probably one of the better points of the story. Four, who’s also known as John Smith for the majority of the book (he was Daniel Jones at the beginning, when they lived in Florida), was the most developed character in the book. I knew almost everything about him. He was born on Lorien, and was raised there until the Mogadorians attacked and destroyed everything; he was sent to Earth with his Cêpan, Henri (at least, that was the name he chose for himself). He had to move frequently, and change his identities along with them, because he could never risk revealing himself to the Mogadorians. He’s also fifteen, but he’s been on Earth for 10 years.

My favourite character, though, was Sam. He was so awesome as the nerd that actually wasn’t that stereotypically nerdy, like they’re usually portrayed. He was pretty well developed, too. He seemed very realistic, like you could find him at school or on the street.  I can’t really say much right now, because some of his background will spoil the story, which isn’t really the best thing to do in a spoiler free review.

I liked the antagonism between John and Mark (Mark is Sarah’s jock exboyfriend that she dumped because she realized that he was a total jerk and that she was growing more and more like him). On the first day, John picks a fight with Mark, which I think wasn’t really the smartest idea, because he’s only a sophomore, and Mark’s a senior. Plus, he couldn’t risk revealing himself as an alien with his superpowers.

The pacing of the book could’ve been improved. There were a couple parts that I thought were unnecessary, and it sometimes dragged. The climax felt like it would go on forever, which isn’t the best thing, because climaxes, in those types of stories, are rather fast paced, energetic, and are supposed to leave your heart thumping (at least, if they’re told well). It was too long for my liking. The sentences were really long, so I guess that contributed to that fact. I wouldn’t be able to think in really long sentences if that were happening to me. But I can’t really tell you what that is.

The romance (yes, there is romance)…well. The only thing I can think of now is the word “cute”. John Smith falls in love with Sarah Hart, who’s a year older than him. I find that he does the noble heroic thing a bit too often, which I guess is understandable considering that he is a hero in a sense. Think Edward protecting Bella (except John is nothing like Edward but in that. Same goes for Sarah). They also got rather sentimental at times.

The version that I read had a bonus, which was Sarah’s diary. I got to see things from her point of view, which was very interesting. I don’t think I’ve ever read any books like that, where there’s a personal account of another, slightly minor character in it.

Also, there were quite a lot of flashbacks and dreams in I Am Number Four. At times, they were good for giving some backstory, and explaining things without giving huge, irritating info dumps. They broke the flow of the story if they were just inserted at random times, though, and I could’ve done without a few of them.

In my opinion, I Am Number Four is an okay book, but not exactly my cup of tea. I still enjoyed it, though.

Airborn (Matt Cruse #1) by Kenneth Oppel


Airborn by Kenneth Oppel

Rating: 4.5 out of 5

Genres: YA Adventure, Fantasy, Steampunk

Matt Cruse is a cabin boy on the airship Aurora, a luxury liner ferrying wealthy people from one place to anotherIt’s the life he’s always wanted; his father was a sailmaker and he believes he’s lighter than air. After rescuing a dying old man from a balloon wreck, he is told that there are beautiful creatures in the sky, ones that humans (except him) have never seen before. Skeptical, Matt learns that the man died the next day.

A year later, Kate de Vries goes aboard the Aurora, intending to see what her grandfather saw when he set out on a balloon expedition. Only after befriending her, and surviving a pirate attack can Matt start to believe that what the old man said could be true.

Kenneth Oppel is an amazing writer. I had the pleasure of meeting him a while back at a festival over here, where he was promoting Half Brother, another book of his. Since it was a festival, and he’s a pretty big deal, along with the fact that there were hundreds of people there, I was mainly ignored after he autographed my paper, even after I said that I loved his books. Hurts. Anyway, I read Airborn during Grade 5; it was totally awesome, so I immediately read the second book that I got from the library with Airborn (by the way, “airborn” is not a typo). I freaked out when I found out we didn’t have Starclimber, and it was this huge deal for me because it was like, the big finale where your mind will probably explode of awesomeness. Just saying.

One of the main reasons why I really liked this book was because it was from a guy’s perspective. I haven’t mentioned this before, because I realized it just now. It’s balancing to read from his point of view, because I find that usually in books girls portray things differently than guys do, especially if it’s in first person. I find that usually, if the protagonist is a teen girl living in the present (even if she’s in a paranormal book, as long as she’s a teenager), then the chances are pretty good that there’s going to be a boy introduced sooner or later, or there already is a boy, and she just spends time thinking about him, and other things that are typically on a stereotype-fitting teen girl’s mind. Sometimes it’s good to take a breather from that, and lose yourself in other perspectives.

The plot was great; although since I read it a couple years ago and I read it again recently, I can’t recall exactly when I was surprised. It had all the makings of a great plot. When the book started, it was already exciting, because Matt was on crow’s nest duty, and had sighted the failing hot air balloon. It was also he who had to swing out of the crane in midair, more than a couple thousand feet high. So already then, you’re on the edge of your seat, waiting to see what happens (obviously he makes it; why else would the book be more than 300 pages?). When Mr. Oppel feeds you the plot, everything’s paced excellently. There were no drags, as far as I could tell, and nothing was resolved too quickly and left me unsatisfied. The climax was nail-biting, thrilling, and eye-widening. In relation to other books, the climax was longer, although people could have different thoughts on when it began and ended. Nevertheless, it’s exciting.

Matt and Kate are awesome. Kate is, in my opinion, an awesome role model for girls. She’s headstrong, intelligent, and independent. Sneaky, too; she outwitted her dry chaperone many times in Airborn. Matt is brave, realistic, and ambitious. He doesn’t seem like the perfect hero with no flaws and will save the damsel in distress (like Kate would let him), which is why I like him. He’s also very comfortable in his surroundings, and has always believed that he belonged in the sky. Like I said before, he’s realistic, so he’s got problems of his own, like how he’ll support his mother and sisters home in Lionsgate City (he’s Canadian, and Kate comes from Lionsgate City, too), because his father died on the job and he’s the main breadwinner in the family. A couple times you see that Matt gets jealous of Bruce Lunardi, the son of the owner of the manufacturer of the Aurora, especially since he took the position that Matt wanted, he’s rich, apparently handsome, and he knew Kate before Matt did.

There’s some romance in this book, mainly between Matt and Kate. It’s not really focused on much, because the main plot is different, and I don’t even think that it’s a major subplot. It’s the second one, in my opinion. Mr. Oppel drops hints, though, that Matt likes Kate. I won’t be a spoilsport and tell you what happens in the end, except that they keep in touch.

The setting is really unique. I don’t know if there’s an official word for it, because it seems like it’s in a different universe, where some things have changed, like the fact that airships are there instead of airplanes, there’s a ship called the Titanica, and there are places like Europa, and the some of the oceans are called Atlanticus and Pacificus. It’s familiar, but different at the same time. It’s not a dystopia, or a utopia. Also, you can’t really put a finger on when it happens. All I can figure out is that it’s not in present day, because life seems simpler and it isn’t muddled with the technology that we have today.

Airborn by Kenneth Oppel is an awesome book. If you like steampunk, fantasy and adventure, you will not be disappointed! Airborn will leave you amazed, and if you liked that one, you’ll love Skybreaker and Starclimber! I will definitely review those.

I Need Your Help


Hello!

Lately I’ve noticed that I reviewed and read a lot of books that could be considered  along the lines of chick lit. I don’t mean, like hardcore chick lit (if there really is such a thing as “hardcore chick lit”), but only a few of my books don’t have “romance” written in the genres section in my reviews. I mean, I know that it can be a major part of any YA book, it’s just that I need a book that isn’t so… girly. It can get tiring after a while.

I know that the last couple of books I’ve reviewed lately actually haven’t really been that girly, but that’s because I read those books a while ago (but I still remember them).

Right now I’m reading The Demon King by Cinda Williams Chima, which is a good break from all that fluffy stuff. I’m also curious to see what other people think, and I want other opinions. So, I;m going to ask you something: what book should I read next?

Comment below to tell me! I’d greatly appreciate it.