I Am Number Four (Lorien Legacies #1) by Pittacus Lore


Wow. It’s been 25 days since I’ve last posted. This is way overdue. I have just been very busy. So, here is my latest review, which is of Pittacus Lore’s I Am Number Four.

I Am Number Four by Pittacus Lore

Book Rating: 3 out of 5

Genres: Fantasy, Sci-fi, Romance, Post Apocalyptic (in a sense)

Lorien, a planet near Earth, was destroyed by the Mogadorians. During the chaos, 9 children were sent to Earth with mentors to continue the race of the Lorics and someday fight back. These 9 children will develop powers, train, and will have to work together if they want to stand a chance against the Mogadorians. They are still being hunted down, except that they can only be killed in order, thanks to a charm cast by one of the elders.

In order to survive, they must keep moving from place to place, and shed all of their identities, and everything they’ve ever known, just to stay safe. But it isn’t enough. The first 3 were killed. And he’s next.

I Am Number Four was generously lent to me from a friend, who offered when I told him I had nothing to read. I accepted it with thanks, thinking that I’d like it, because I’d seen the movie, and it wasn’t that bad.

Overall, it was an okay book. It wasn’t horrible, but it wasn’t one of those books where I told every single person I knew and bugged them to read it. It was like, “Read, and move on.”

The characters were probably one of the better points of the story. Four, who’s also known as John Smith for the majority of the book (he was Daniel Jones at the beginning, when they lived in Florida), was the most developed character in the book. I knew almost everything about him. He was born on Lorien, and was raised there until the Mogadorians attacked and destroyed everything; he was sent to Earth with his Cêpan, Henri (at least, that was the name he chose for himself). He had to move frequently, and change his identities along with them, because he could never risk revealing himself to the Mogadorians. He’s also fifteen, but he’s been on Earth for 10 years.

My favourite character, though, was Sam. He was so awesome as the nerd that actually wasn’t that stereotypically nerdy, like they’re usually portrayed. He was pretty well developed, too. He seemed very realistic, like you could find him at school or on the street.  I can’t really say much right now, because some of his background will spoil the story, which isn’t really the best thing to do in a spoiler free review.

I liked the antagonism between John and Mark (Mark is Sarah’s jock exboyfriend that she dumped because she realized that he was a total jerk and that she was growing more and more like him). On the first day, John picks a fight with Mark, which I think wasn’t really the smartest idea, because he’s only a sophomore, and Mark’s a senior. Plus, he couldn’t risk revealing himself as an alien with his superpowers.

The pacing of the book could’ve been improved. There were a couple parts that I thought were unnecessary, and it sometimes dragged. The climax felt like it would go on forever, which isn’t the best thing, because climaxes, in those types of stories, are rather fast paced, energetic, and are supposed to leave your heart thumping (at least, if they’re told well). It was too long for my liking. The sentences were really long, so I guess that contributed to that fact. I wouldn’t be able to think in really long sentences if that were happening to me. But I can’t really tell you what that is.

The romance (yes, there is romance)…well. The only thing I can think of now is the word “cute”. John Smith falls in love with Sarah Hart, who’s a year older than him. I find that he does the noble heroic thing a bit too often, which I guess is understandable considering that he is a hero in a sense. Think Edward protecting Bella (except John is nothing like Edward but in that. Same goes for Sarah). They also got rather sentimental at times.

The version that I read had a bonus, which was Sarah’s diary. I got to see things from her point of view, which was very interesting. I don’t think I’ve ever read any books like that, where there’s a personal account of another, slightly minor character in it.

Also, there were quite a lot of flashbacks and dreams in I Am Number Four. At times, they were good for giving some backstory, and explaining things without giving huge, irritating info dumps. They broke the flow of the story if they were just inserted at random times, though, and I could’ve done without a few of them.

In my opinion, I Am Number Four is an okay book, but not exactly my cup of tea. I still enjoyed it, though.

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